"

"They’re like, ‘Sir, there’s something in your bag.’

I said, ‘Yes, I think it’s this box.’

They said, ‘What’s in the box?’

I said, ‘a large gold medal,’ as one does.

So they opened it up and they said, ‘What’s it made out of?’

I said, ‘gold.’

And they’re like, ‘Uhhhh. Who gave this to you?’

‘The King of Sweden.’

‘Why did he give this to you?’

‘Because I helped discover the expansion rate of the universe was accelerating.’

"

Brian Schmidt, 2011 Nobel Prize winner in Physics, explaining his Nobel Prize to the TSA agents inspecting it on his flight to see his grandmother in Fargo.

Today, in conversations I will never have ….

(via politicalprof)

leeandlow:

"Just from a creative standpoint there are just entire genres that I’m locked out of, being Asian, because of historical reality. You know, like the cowboy picture (laughs). Basically you’re doing immigrants, smaller immigrant roles. And if you’re doing bigger roles, you’re…

squarerootofcruyff:

World Cup Illustrations by Simon Prades

[Source]

letterstomycountry:

otpglobal:

"You see, I work for McDonald’s in Denmark, where an agreement between our union and the company guarantees that workers older than 18 are paid at least $21 an hour. Employees younger than 18 make at least $15 — meaning teenagers working at McDonald’s in Denmark make more than two times what many adults in America earn working at the Golden Arches.

To anyone who says that fast-food jobs can’t be good jobs, I would answer that mine isn’t bad. In fact, parts of it are just fine. Under our union’s agreement with McDonald’s, for example, I receive paid sick leave that workers are still fighting for in many parts of the world. We also get overtime pay, guaranteed hours and at least two days off a week, unlike workers in most countries. At least 10 percent of the staff in any given restaurant must work at least 30 hours a week.”

"McDonald’s didn’t give us our union. We had to fight for it. It was a five-year struggle that involved many demonstrations like the ones that will stretch across the globe on Thursday."

LTMC:  Another thing that’s interesting to note here is that Denmark has no statutory minimum wage.  Instead, all wages are negotiated between unions and employer organizations.  The market-based “minimum wage,” according to Wikipedia, is around DKK 110, or $20/hour.  And far from being crushed by chronic unemployment, Denmark’s unemployment rate is around 7%.  Their unemployment rate for people under 25 is around 12%.  This is actually lower than the unemployment rate for people under 25 in America, despite the fact that America’s national minimum wage is lower by a factor of almost 3.  The labor force participation rate in Denmark is also higher than the U.S., undermining the notion that a robust welfare state necessarily reduces incentive to work.

explore-blog:

Trailer for the film about legendary political theorist Hannah Arendt. 

Why you should care.

(via Progressive Geographies

(Source: explore-blog)

theatlantic:

In Defense of Instagram Selfies from Crimea

The Daily Mail was positively apoplectic. “Shocking pictures show people in Crimea taking SELFIES with Russian masked gunmen as Ukraine teeters on the brink of war,” the British tabloid yelped over the weekend. Did you catch that? SELFIES!
Others were equally astonished. “Welcome to the 21st century, where you take Instagram selfies with the guys invading your country,” a Twitter user marveled.
Putting aside one of the explanations for this stream of selfies—a substantial pro-Moscow, ethnic Russian population on the peninsula—it’s actually quite fitting that amateur and professional photographers are experimenting with new technology this week to document Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian peninsula. A century and a half ago, Crimea served as the breeding ground for modern war photography.
Read more. [Image: Roger Fenton/anna_yurtaeva]


Speechless.

theatlantic:

In Defense of Instagram Selfies from Crimea

The Daily Mail was positively apoplectic. “Shocking pictures show people in Crimea taking SELFIES with Russian masked gunmen as Ukraine teeters on the brink of war,” the British tabloid yelped over the weekend. Did you catch that? SELFIES!

Others were equally astonished. “Welcome to the 21st century, where you take Instagram selfies with the guys invading your country,” a Twitter user marveled.

Putting aside one of the explanations for this stream of selfies—a substantial pro-Moscow, ethnic Russian population on the peninsula—it’s actually quite fitting that amateur and professional photographers are experimenting with new technology this week to document Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian peninsula. A century and a half ago, Crimea served as the breeding ground for modern war photography.

Read more. [Image: Roger Fenton/anna_yurtaeva]

Speechless.

fuckyeahvintage-retro:

Alfred Hitchcock at the Cannes Film Festival, 1963 © Francois Gragnon

futurejournalismproject:

Beethoven, Original Punk
Via The Atlantic:

The popular image of [Beethoven] is one of heroism, severity, and backs aching for the lash as musical commandments are delivered from on high. Few works in the history of art are as bracingly intense as a goodly chunk of Beethoven’s piano sonatas, for instance, to say nothing of the late-period string quartets, music that, frankly, the 19th century wasn’t ready for. The opening four notes of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony might as well be a stand-in for the four elements of earth, air, fire, and water, such is their uncompromising primacy. Beethoven’s work, as people tend to think of it, is music that just keeps coming at you, an ever-advancing sea that no coast can withstand.
Most of the time, that is. But there was also the occasion when Beethoven, in the midst of a personal—and odd—life crisis, opted to create a work to please madcaps, jesters, and wiseasses alike.
I’m talking about the Eighth Symphony. It’s arguably Beethoven’s most overlooked, coming as it does before the world-beating Ninth, and clocking in at a rapid 26 minutes. It was the last symphony from Beethoven’s middle period, receiving its premiere 200 years ago on February 24, 1814, in Vienna. And it is absolutely bonkers, mad, brave, cheekily pugnacious, punchy, and akin to what Lear’s Fool, Samuel Beckett, and a young Mozart might have come up with if those three ever got together to have a musical bash.

Beethoven’s 8th, 200 years old today.
Read on about his infatuation with a newly created technology called the metronome, deafness and his frustration with his brother’s love affair.

futurejournalismproject:

Beethoven, Original Punk

Via The Atlantic:

The popular image of [Beethoven] is one of heroism, severity, and backs aching for the lash as musical commandments are delivered from on high. Few works in the history of art are as bracingly intense as a goodly chunk of Beethoven’s piano sonatas, for instance, to say nothing of the late-period string quartets, music that, frankly, the 19th century wasn’t ready for. The opening four notes of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony might as well be a stand-in for the four elements of earth, air, fire, and water, such is their uncompromising primacy. Beethoven’s work, as people tend to think of it, is music that just keeps coming at you, an ever-advancing sea that no coast can withstand.

Most of the time, that is. But there was also the occasion when Beethoven, in the midst of a personal—and odd—life crisis, opted to create a work to please madcaps, jesters, and wiseasses alike.

I’m talking about the Eighth Symphony. It’s arguably Beethoven’s most overlooked, coming as it does before the world-beating Ninth, and clocking in at a rapid 26 minutes. It was the last symphony from Beethoven’s middle period, receiving its premiere 200 years ago on February 24, 1814, in Vienna. And it is absolutely bonkers, mad, brave, cheekily pugnacious, punchy, and akin to what Lear’s Fool, Samuel Beckett, and a young Mozart might have come up with if those three ever got together to have a musical bash.

Beethoven’s 8th, 200 years old today.

Read on about his infatuation with a newly created technology called the metronome, deafness and his frustration with his brother’s love affair.

humansofnewyork:

"I’m trying to figure out what direction I should be moving in.""What direction are you currently moving in?""I’m not sure I’m moving."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m trying to figure out what direction I should be moving in."
"What direction are you currently moving in?"
"I’m not sure I’m moving."